HOW TO MANAGE BREAD DOUGH TEMPERATURE

Did you know there’s one simple tool that could revolutionize your bread baking forever?

that tool? It’s a digital thermometer.

 

If you’re thinking that the last thing that you need in your kitchen is another tool, no worries. Digital thermometers are generally about the length of an everyday spoon and less than 2 inches wide.

 

When it comes to cost, some digital thermometers cost as little as $5.

So how will this simple tool make help you improve your bread baking? By verifying the temperature of the liquid used to dissolve your yeast. At a temperature range between 105- and 110-degrees (Fahrenheit), yeast thrives and produces a light, high-rising loaf of bread. Once your liquid falls within this temperature range, you can be certain your yeast won’t be killed by liquid that’s too hot. You’ll also know that it’s warm enough to start working in your dough once you’ve combined all the ingredients.

 

If you use an instant-read thermometer, it will take you about two seconds to check the liquid temperature. If you opt to use a less expensive model, it may take up to 10 seconds. The step adds very little time to your bread baking process and contributes greatly to the quality of your loaf.

 

So, what kind of digital thermometers should you use in baking bread? There are numerous types to consider.

 

  1. The least costly digital thermometer that I’ve come across, $5.49, will work just fine for this task. Since it’s being used for a few seconds each time, it’s likely to last for many years.
  2. Higher priced digital thermometers range from $10 to more than $30. The one I currently use cost $13 and has worked just fine for the past two years. If I find I need to replace it, I will try the less costly option to see how it holds up.
  3. Instant-read thermometers are very convenient, but much more costly. Prices often begin at the $80 range. While the convenience is nice, it’s not necessary to accomplish the task of verifying the liquid temperature.

 

If you’ve never used a digital thermometer in your kitchen before, you may find that you like it and can justify paying a higher price for one. It’s all a matter of personal preference.

 

Whichever model you select, I highly recommend implementing the practice of checking your liquid’s temperature, especially if you’ve struggled to produce satisfactory loaves of bread. This step, in combination with the use of a bread machine, took my bread baking results from disappointing to amazing.

 

And what role did the bread machine play? Since the mixing and kneading take place in a canister, you can warm the canister before placing your ingredients inside it. This helps maintain that ideal temperature range you set up by checking your recipe liquid. Your bread dough will start at an ideal temperature range and remain there until it’s baked in the bread machine or, you prepare it for the final rise to bake in your oven.

 

If you decide to bake the bread in your oven, warm your bread pan before coating it and placing the dough in it. Complete the final rise inside your warmed oven (just don’t leave the oven on during the rise time) or in an area where you can manage the temperature to help keep it warm (90-100 degrees is ideal).

Print

BREAD MACHINE RYE BREAD

  • Author: Loretta Sorensen

Description

This rye bread recipe is easy, so tasty and gives you a great portion of nutrition.


Scale

Ingredients

Butter, oil or no-stick spray to coat bread pan

Ingredients:

1 ¼ cups water, ranging from 105 to 110 degrees

1 ½ teaspoons yeast

¼ cup brown sugar

1 Tablespoon gluten

2 1/42 ½ cups 100% white wheat flour (red wheat will produce a coarser loaf)

1 ¾ cup 100% rye flour

1 ½ teaspoons salt (I recommend Himalayan pink salt)

2 Tablespoons of melted butter or oil

2 Tablespoons molasses


Instructions

Equipment:

2- to 3-quart mixing bowl

2-cup measuring utensil

Tablespoon

Measuring cups, from ¼-cup size on up to 1-cup

Whisk or fork

Digital thermometer

Bread machine

Bread pan

Spatula

If necessary (typically during the winter months), use hot tap water to heat your measuring utensil and bread machine canister before preparing your bread dough. This usually takes just a few minutes once the hot water is placed in the utensil. Pour the water out before measuring your ingredients.

 

Place 1 ¼ cups of hot tap water in 2-cup measuring utensil. Add the sugar and stir it thoroughly to blend it with the water. Check the water’s temperature. If it’s below 105 degrees (Fahrenheit), warm 1 or 2 Tablespoons of the liquid on your stove top to boost the yeast mixture’s overall temperature (105-110 degrees); if too hot, allow it to cool for a few minutes. Once the mixture is within the desired temperature range, add the yeast and stir to dissolve it.

 

Allow the yeast mixture to rest for about 3 minutes. It will form a foamy “head” to indicate that the yeast is activated.

 

While you wait for the yeast, blend dry ingredients. In a large mixing bowl, measure flour, gluten and salt. Sift the ingredients together using a whisk or a fork.

 

If using butter, melt it slightly or cut into small pieces so it blends thoroughly with your dough.

 

Once your yeast mixture is ready, pour out the water used to heat the bread machine canister. Carefully pour the yeast mixture into the pan, using a spatula to clear the measuring cup. Carefully add the flour mixture to the canister. Pour the oil or softened/chopped butter and the molasses on top of the flour. Select your machine settings and start the mixing/kneading process.

 

My bread machine completes a cycle of mix/knead (10-18 minutes), rest (20 minutes), mix/knead (10-18 minutes).  Observe the dough as it mixes. It should pull away from the side of the canister. If it doesn’t, it’s too sticky. Add flour 1-2 Tablespoons at a time until it forms a solid ball.

 

Before the last part of the dough cycle completes, prepare your bread pan. If necessary, warm the pan before coating it (spraying with non-stick product, insert parchment, etc.).

 

Once the dough cycle is completed, gently place the dough into the coated bread pan, cover it and place it in a warm area (I use my oven, which I heat to close to as warm as 120 degrees). It will take 30-45 minutes for the dough to raise.

 

Once the dough is raised, place it in a pre-heated 350-degree (Fahrenheit) oven to bake for 30-45 minutes or until the crust is nicely browned. Remove from the oven and immediately place on a cooling rack. Try to give it some time to cool before you cut any slices!

 

Once it’s completely cooled, store the bread in a plastic bag. In summer, home-made bread quickly spoils and should be refrigerated once it’s cooled.


RYE BREAD

WHY RYE?

As you develop bread-baking skills, don’t pass on rye bread recipes. This grain offers a big helping of nutrients and the tangy flavor can be a welcome change from either white bread or other whole grains.

According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, their study found that “eating rye leads to better blood-sugar control compared to wheat. Rye bread is packed with magnesium, which helps control blood pressure and optimize heart health.” This grain’s high levels of soluble fiber can also reduce cholesterol.

A word of advice: don’t make 100% rye bread unless you want STRONG flavor. Rye also has less gluten than wheat, so it won’t raise as readily as wheat bread.

This recipe makes either one large loaf or two smaller ones. If you make one loaf, use a 9×5 loaf pan. Otherwise, you can divide the dough (2/3 and 1/3) and use an 8.5×4.5 loaf plan plus a mini loaf pan. You could also use 2/3 of the dough for a loaf and the other 1/3 to make rolls. All tasty!

BREAD MACHINE RYE BREAD
Equipment:
2- to 3-quart mixing bowl
2-cup measuring utensil
Tablespoon
Measuring cups, from ¼-cup size on up to 1-cup
Whisk or fork
Digital thermometer
Bread machine
Bread pan
Spatula

Butter, oil or no-stick spray to coat bread pan
Ingredients:
1 ¼ cups water, ranging from 105 to 110 degrees
1 ½ teaspoons yeast
¼ cup brown sugar

1 Tablespoon gluten
2 1/4 – 2 ½ cups 100% white wheat flour (red wheat will produce a coarser loaf)
1 ¾ cup 100% rye flour
1 ½ teaspoons salt (I recommend Himalayan pink salt)

2 Tablespoons of melted butter or oil
2 Tablespoons molasses

Print

BREAD MACHINE RYE BREAD

  • Author: Loretta Sorensen

Description

WHY RYE?

 

As you develop bread-baking skills, don’t pass on rye bread recipes. This grain offers a big helping of nutrients and the tangy flavor can be a welcome change from either white bread or other whole grains.

 

According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, their study found that “eating rye leads to better blood-sugar control compared to wheat. Rye bread is packed with magnesium, which helps control blood pressure and optimize heart health.” This grain’s high levels of soluble fiber can also reduce cholesterol.

 

A word of advice: don’t make 100% rye bread unless you want STRONG flavor. Rye also has less gluten than wheat, so it won’t raise as readily as wheat bread.

 

This recipe makes either one large loaf or two smaller ones. If you make one loaf, use a 9×5 loaf pan. Otherwise, you can divide the dough (2/3 and 1/3) and use an 8.5×4.5 loaf plan plus a mini loaf pan. You could also use 2/3 of the dough for a loaf and the other 1/3 to make rolls. All tasty!

 

 


Scale

Ingredients

Butter, oil or no-stick spray to coat bread pan

Ingredients:

1 ¼ cups water, ranging from 105 to 110 degrees

1 ½ teaspoons yeast

¼ cup brown sugar

1 Tablespoon gluten

2 1/42 ½ cups 100% white wheat flour (red wheat will produce a coarser loaf)

1 ¾ cup 100% rye flour

1 ½ teaspoons salt (I recommend Himalayan pink salt)

2 Tablespoons of melted butter or oil

2 Tablespoons molasses


Instructions

Equipment:

2- to 3-quart mixing bowl

2-cup measuring utensil

Tablespoon

Measuring cups, from ¼-cup size on up to 1-cup

Whisk or fork

Digital thermometer

Bread machine

Bread pan

Spatula

If necessary (typically during the winter months), use hot tap water to heat your measuring utensil and bread machine canister before preparing your bread dough. This usually takes just a few minutes once the hot water is placed in the utensil. Pour the water out before measuring your ingredients.

 

Place 1 ¼ cups of hot tap water in 2-cup measuring utensil. Add the sugar and stir it thoroughly to blend it with the water. Check the water’s temperature. If it’s below 105 degrees (Fahrenheit), warm 1 or 2 Tablespoons of the liquid on your stove top to boost the yeast mixture’s overall temperature (105-110 degrees); if too hot, allow it to cool for a few minutes. Once the mixture is within the desired temperature range, add the yeast and stir to dissolve it.

 

Allow the yeast mixture to rest for about 3 minutes. It will form a foamy “head” to indicate that the yeast is activated.

 

While you wait for the yeast, blend dry ingredients. In a large mixing bowl, measure flour, gluten and salt. Sift the ingredients together using a whisk or a fork.

 

If using butter, melt it slightly or cut into small pieces so it blends thoroughly with your dough.

 

Once your yeast mixture is ready, pour out the water used to heat the bread machine canister. Carefully pour the yeast mixture into the pan, using a spatula to clear the measuring cup. Carefully add the flour mixture to the canister. Pour the oil or softened/chopped butter and the molasses on top of the flour. Select your machine settings and start the mixing/kneading process.

 

My bread machine completes a cycle of mix/knead (10-18 minutes), rest (20 minutes), mix/knead (10-18 minutes).  Observe the dough as it mixes. It should pull away from the side of the canister and form a ball. If it doesn’t, it’s too sticky. Add flour 1-2 Tablespoons at a time until it forms a ball.

 

Before the last part of the dough cycle completes, prepare your bread pan. If necessary, warm the pan before coating it (spraying with non-stick product, insert parchment, etc.).

 

Once the dough cycle is completed, gently place the dough into the coated bread pan, cover it and place it in a warm area (I use my oven, which I heat to close to as warm as 120 degrees). It will take 30-45 minutes for the dough to raise.

 

Once the dough is raised, place it in a pre-heated 350-degree (Fahrenheit) oven to bake for 30-45 minutes or until the crust is nicely browned. Remove from the oven and immediately place on a cooling rack. Try to give it some time to cool before you cut any slices!

 

Once it’s completely cooled, store the bread in a plastic bag. In summer, home-made bread quickly spoils and should be refrigerated once it’s cooled.


Method:
If necessary (typically during the winter months), use hot tap water to heat your measuring utensil and bread machine canister before preparing your bread dough. This usually takes just a few minutes once the hot water is placed in the utensil. Pour the water out before measuring your ingredients.

Place 1 ¼ cups of hot tap water in 2-cup measuring utensil. Add the sugar and stir it thoroughly to blend it with the water. Check the water’s temperature. If it’s below 105 degrees (Fahrenheit), warm 1 or 2 Tablespoons of the liquid on your stovetop to boost the yeast mixture’s overall temperature (105-110 degrees); if too hot, allow it to cool for a few minutes. Once the mixture is within the desired temperature range, add the yeast and stir to dissolve it.

Allow the yeast mixture to rest for about 3 minutes. It will form a foamy “head” to indicate that the yeast is activated.

While you wait for the yeast, blend dry ingredients. In a large mixing bowl, measure flour, gluten, and salt. Sift the ingredients together using a whisk or a fork.

If using butter, melt it slightly or cut into small pieces so it blends thoroughly with your dough.

Once your yeast mixture is ready, pour out the water used to heat the bread machine canister. Carefully pour the yeast mixture into the pan, using a spatula to clear the measuring cup. Carefully add the flour mixture to the canister. Pour the oil or softened/chopped butter and the molasses on top of the flour. Select your machine settings and start the mixing/kneading process.

My bread machine completes a cycle of mix/knead (10-18 minutes), rest (20 minutes), mix/knead (10-18 minutes).  Observe the dough as it mixes. It should pull away from the side of the canister and form a ball. If it doesn’t, it’s too sticky. Add flour 1-2 Tablespoons at a time until it forms a ball.

Before the last part of the dough cycle completes, prepare your bread pan. If necessary, warm the pan before coating it (spraying with a non-stick product, insert parchment, etc.).

Once the dough cycle is completed, gently place the dough into the coated bread pan, cover it and place it in a warm area (I use my oven, which I heat to close to as warm as 120 degrees). It will take 30-45 minutes for the dough to rise.

Once the dough is raised, place it in a preheated 350-degree (Fahrenheit) oven to bake for 30-45 minutes or until the crust is nicely browned. Remove from the oven and immediately place it on a cooling rack. Try to give it some time to cool before you cut any slices!

Once it’s completely cooled, store the bread in a plastic bag. In summer, home-made bread quickly spoils and should be refrigerated once it’s cooled.

THE GIFT OF BREAD!

Since homemade bread is a somewhat rare commodity today, you may have family and/or friends who will appreciate receiving a homemade loaf.

Depending on how many people make it to your “homemade bread gift list,” you may need to produce multiple loaves in short order. Within 8 to 10 hours, you can make at least 6 loaves of bread using my “streamlined” method.

Step 1: Inventory your ingredients. Make sure you have enough flour, sugar, and yeast on hand to make as many loaves as you need. Here’s a typical ingredient list for 6 2-pound loaves of bread:

  • Flour – an average of 3 ¾ cups per loaf = 22.5 cups. A five-pound bag of flour will make an average of 5 loaves.
  • Sugar – generally, a recipe for this loaf size will not call for more than ¼ cup of sugar per loaf. For 6 loaves, you’ll need 1 ½ cups of sugar. If you use another sweetener, multiply the amount for one loaf by 6.
  • Yeast – my recipe for a 2-pound loaf calls for 1.5 teaspoons of yeast. To ensure you have enough yeast to make multiple loaves with your recipe, multiply the yeast amount by the number of loaves you’re making.
  • You’ll also need salt and either butter or oil in your recipe.
  • Depending on your recipe ingredients, you may need milk and/or some additional ingredients (i.e., potato flakes to help keep the bread soft).
  • If necessary, measure out each ingredient so you can verify that you have what you need.

When baking multiple loaves, it helps to assemble all your ingredients in one place to speed measuring activities. You may also consider measuring all dry ingredients one or two days before you’re ready to bake. You can combine flour and salt but keep sugar and yeast amounts separated until you’re ready to use them.

If possible, set up an area close to your oven where the final rise can be completed. Once you start baking the loaves, the area around your oven should be warmer than the overall room temperature, which means the dough will rise more quickly.

To keep track of what stage each batch of dough is at, you can set timers (I use both the microwave and an old dial-type timer) so you don’t forget to put the dough into a loaf pan or into the oven. You’ll also want to time the bake time for each loaf (generally 30 minutes). A sheet that lists “Loaf 1,” “Loaf 2,” etc. can also help. Before you begin, estimate the time each batch of dough will be ready to put in a loaf pan and the time you expect it will be ready for the oven. This can help you accurately track each batch of dough since you’ll be able to work on other things as the process progresses.

It will be helpful to set up an area where each loaf can thoroughly cool before you bag it. If you don’t have enough cooling racks to accommodate all the loaves, you can suspend the loaf between two objects, with each edge of the loaf (set them up lengthwise) on boxes, pans, even plates. Just make sure heat can escape from the bottom of the bread, or it will become soggy.

Bag each loaf as soon as it’s cool. You can decorate the bag with stickers, ribbon, even wrapping paper if you like. Since homemade bread has no preservatives, be sure to store the loaves in a cool location (equivalent to a refrigerator) until you share them. You may also consider including a note about how to store the bread to keep it from spoiling.

Happy baking!

How to Activate Yeast

This 2-minute video shows how I activate my yeast to get high-rising bread.

YEAST BREAD RISING TIPS

Here’s a short video that explains all you need to know to start baking bread as you’ve never baked before! Check it out! If you’re ready to start baking, find all the details in “Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever!” at this link: https://bakeyourbestever.com/product/secrets-to-baking-your-best-bread-ever/https://bakeyourbestever.com/product/secrets-to-baking-your-best-bread-ever/

 

FLUFFY WHITE BREAD VIDEO

Watch step-by-step instructions to bake this incredibly soft, tender white bread!

 

Easy bread machine tips!

check out this article about how to use a digital thermometer to make  homemade bread recipes a breeze!

https://www.yankton.net/community/article_87e5c32a-1234-11e9-8ff2-0730ec8a94ce.htmlhttps://www.yankton.net/community/article_87e5c32a-1234-11e9-8ff2-0730ec8a94ce.html

 

BREAD MACHINE RYE BREAD RECIPE

Rye has many health benefits, and rye bread has a wonderful flavor – especially when it’s paired with cheese! This recipe is 100% whole grain – no white flour!

For all these reasons, I’ve worked hard to develop a satisfactory two-pound Bread Machine Rye Bread recipe.

I use a blend of white wheat and rye flour, with slightly more wheat than rye. And since rye flour has less gluten than wheat, I add 1 Tablespoon of wheat gluten to get a nice rise. If you prefer a heavier bread, you can omit the gluten. For a greater rye flavor, simply use a greater ratio of rye to wheat flour.

As always, I use my signature digital thermometer method (see this link: https://www.grit.com/food/digital-thermometers-to-bake-bread) to warm recipe liquid to a specific temperature range so my yeast has what it needs to work.

BREAD MACHINE RYE BREAD

Equipment:

2- to 3-quart mixing bowl

2-cup measuring utensil

Tablespoon

Measuring cups, from ¼-cup size on up to 1-cup

Whisk or fork

Digital thermometer

Bread machine

Bread pan

Spatula

 

Butter, oil or no-stick spray to coat bread pan

Ingredients:

1 ¼ cups water, ranging from 105 to 110 degrees

1 ½ teaspoons yeast

¼ cup brown sugar

 

1 Tablespoon gluten

2 1/4 – 2 ½ cups 100% white wheat flour (red wheat will produce a coarser loaf)

1 ¾ cup 100% rye flour

1 ½ teaspoons salt (I recommend Himalayan pink salt)

 

2 Tablespoons of melted butter or oil

2 Tablespoons molasses

 

Method:

If necessary (typically during the winter months), use hot tap water to heat your measuring utensil and bread machine canister before preparing your bread dough. This takes just a few moments. Pour the water out before using the utensil.

Place 1 ¼ cups of hot tap water in 2-cup measuring utensil. Add the sugar and stir it thoroughly to blend it with the water. Check the water’s temperature. If it’s below 105 degrees (Fahrenheit), warm 1 or 2 Tablespoons of the liquid on your stove top to boost the yeast mixture’s overall temperature (105-110 degrees); if too hot, allow it to cool for a few minutes. Once the mixture is within the desired temperature range, add the yeast and stir to dissolve it.

Allow the yeast mixture to rest for about 3 minutes. It will form a foamy “head” to indicate that the yeast is activated.

While you wait for the yeast, blend dry ingredients. In a large mixing bowl, measure flour, gluten and salt. Sift the ingredients together using a whisk or a fork.

If using butter, melt it slightly or cut into small pieces so it blends thoroughly with your dough.

Once your yeast mixture is ready, pour out the water used to heat the bread machine canister. Carefully pour the yeast mixture into the pan, using a spatula to clear the measuring cup. Carefully add the flour mixture to the canister. Pour the oil or softened/chopped butter and the molasses on top of the flour. Select your machine settings and start the mixing/kneading process.

My bread machine completes a cycle of mix/knead (10-18 minutes), rest (20 minutes), mix/knead (10-18 minutes).  Observe the dough as it mixes. It should pull away from the side of the canister. If it doesn’t, it’s too sticky. Add flour 1-2 Tablespoons at a time until it forms a solid ball.

Before the last part of the dough cycle completes, prepare your bread pan. If necessary, warm the pan before coating it (spraying with non-stick product, insert parchment, etc.).

Once the dough cycle is completed, gently place the dough into the coated bread pan, cover it and place it in a warm area (I use my oven, which I heat to close to as warm as 120 degrees). It will take 30-45 minutes for the dough to raise.

Once the dough is raised, place it in a pre-heated 350-degree (Fahrenheit) oven to bake for 30-45 minutes or until the crust is nicely browned. Remove from the oven and immediately place on a cooling rack. Try to give it some time to cool before you cut any slices!

Once it’s completely cooled, store the bread in a plastic bag. In summer, home-made bread quickly spoils and should be refrigerated once it’s cooled.

Find more of Loretta Sorensen’s recipes, bread baking tips and her book at www.bakeyourbestever.com. Her recent book, Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever!contains recipes and a wealth of baking pointers. Follow her on Facebook and Pinterest (Secrets To Baking Your Best Bread Ever).

 

 

 

 

HEALTHY HOMEMADE EZEKIEL BREAD RECIPE

This is my original recipe, developed after researching other existing recipes and the description of the bread ingredients given in the Bible’s book of Ezekiel.

I make this in a bread machine (cycle includes 18 minutes mix/knead, 20 minute rest, 18 minutes mix/knead). After the second mix/knead cycle, I put the dough in a regular bread pan and bake it in the oven.

An important part of this recipe – to get the rise and light bread texture you desire – is to warm recipe liquid as instructed and to keep the dough warm throughout the mixing and final rise processes.

Ingredients:

1 ¼ cups water (I use hot tap water but you can warm on the stovetop, too)

¼ cup honey or maple syrup

1 ½ teaspoons instant yeast

In cold weather, I heat the measuring cup with some hot water before I use it so it doesn’t affect the temperature range I want.

Measure the water and syrup into a measuring cup. Using a digital thermometer, check the temperature range. If it’s below 105, you can warm ¼ cup of the liquid on the stovetop to reach the correct temperature range. Once it’s the correct temperature, stir in the yeast, dissolving as much of the yeast as possible. Set aside.

2 ¼ cups white wheat flour (red wheat flour produces a coarser bread)

¾ cup spelt flour

¼ cup barley flour

¼ cup millet flour

¼ cup lentil flour

¼ cup bean flour (I used black bean but any bean flour would work)

1 ½ teaspoons salt

1 Tablespoon wheat gluten (optional but not necessaryhttps://bakeyourbestever.com/?p=2417&preview=true

Sift all dry ingredients well.

 

Pour yeast mixture into bread machine (if temperatures are really cold, you can heat the bread machine canister with hot water before you use it). Add dry ingredients.

2 Tablespoons olive oil or vegetable oil

Pour the oil on top of the dry ingredients. Start the machine.

My bread machine has two dough kneading cycles. I allow it to complete both cycles, then take the dough and place it in a bread pan sprayed with a non-stick product. I cover it with a tea towel to help keep it from drying out while it raises.

I place my bread dough in the oven for the final rise. Before you place the dough in the oven, you can preheat the oven to around 100 degrees, which aids the rising process. Within 30 to 45 minutes the dough should raise satisfactorily. Remove it from the oven; heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the dough for 30 to 45 minutes or until the crust is well browned. Remove from the oven and immediately take the bread out of the pan and cool on a rack for a couple of hours.

Enjoy!